To everything there is a season

8tracks has had a long run and its day in the sun. We’re sad to announce, however, that the company and its streaming service will wind down with the end of the decade, on December 31st, 2019.

We have mixed feelings as we round out this decade and the life of 8tracks. We served many listeners and DJs well, at important times in their lives, for more than a decade, introducing adventurous listeners to new artists they may never have otherwise discovered, and for that we’re proud. On the other hand, we recognize we’ve disappointed many listeners and DJs, employees, investors and partners. We all wish we’d had the opportunity to continue to innovate in the music sector and serve our community and other stakeholders well, just as we had in our earlier years.

If you’d like to hear the “extended dance remix” of our journey, read on. If you’d rather skip to the TL;DR behind our decision, scroll down to bottom of this post.

 

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A brief history of 137 months

Twenty years ago this month, inspired by the DJ-led dance music culture of 90s London and Napster’s “hotlist” feature, I completed a business plan for an online playlist sharing community, called Sampled & Sorted. Bootstrapping wasn’t an option in this era, and funding proved challenging after the NASDAQ crashed the following spring. So I decided instead to learn the ropes of a user-generated music streaming model (and startup life in general) at Live365, an internet radio service that predated Pandora. Some 8 years later, informed by my original business plan, lessons from Live365 and the mainstream adoption of social media, 8tracks launched on August 8, 2008 — some 137 months ago.

8tracks’ arrival came at a time of innovation and optimism. Obama would be elected a few months later, Facebook and Twitter were loved and exploding with promise, and the startup scene of NYC (where 8tracks was based) was hitting its stride, with Tumblr leading the way. 8tracks itself innovated in a few areas out of the gate: the playlist was the atomic unit of curation, sharing and consumption; each playlist was represented visually by its mix art, a couple of years before Instagram’s arrival; and DJs could apply freeform tags to describe a playlist by not only by genre or artist but also by activity, mood or other theme, introducing a novel, contextual approach to listening that Songza, Beats, Spotify and others would later emulate.

We hit the ground running, with Peter Kafka‘s thoughtful coverage at launch and Om Malik‘s favorable comparison to Muxtape shortly after it was forced to shut down. A couple of 8tracks mixes blew up on StumbleUpon the following spring, boosting our active users from 30k to 300k in a single month. While we had initially self-funded from my 401(k) and my co-founder Remi‘s savings, we saw enough growth to raise angel funding — allowing us to keep pace with growing royalty and bandwidth costs and pay a few part-time contractors. I moved back to San Francisco, and we found a unique, inexpensive loft space near Dolores Park where I lived and the team and I worked.

As a result of steady growth and an introduction by Alex Ljung to Index Ventures, we raised a $1.2m seed round in August 2011 — exactly 3 years after launch, and enough to begin paying full-time employees for the first time. I was also excited personally, as the round included not only Andreessen Horowitz (a16z) but also English DJ Pete Tong and Chairman/CEO of Atlantic Records Craig Kallman. Armed with our first significant funding, we grew > 5X in 18 months (4.1m streaming hours to 21.9m streaming hours) and reached monthly profitability (under the now-defunct Small Webcaster license) in 18 months. Good times.

But each Up came with its commensurate Down. Our positive operating and financial metrics suggested we should raise a larger A round to double down on growth. However, Index and a16z, the venture firms that had invested in the initial seed round, passed on leading our A round. In fairness, the benchmarks for VC investment at this stage were (and are) high; we were on track to be huge, but it wasn’t clear we were on track for a >$1bn exit, particularly given the competition. To paraphrase one VC: our growth was good and, as a result, it was likely we’d be acquired by a larger internet or music streaming company, capping their upside. While a reasonable thesis, this made it harder to raise funding elsewhere.

The VC’s perspective proved prescient: Google reached out to us later that year (2013) to explore acquisition. We decided not to pursue the opportunity, as Google envisioned an acqui-hire, re-purposing our engineers to make Google Play “more social” and likely shutting down the existing service. We had our sights set on growing 8tracks into a large independent company, and our growth had continued unabated: we now reached nearly 8m MAU who streamed 30m+ hours each month. We had generated over $500,000 in ad revenues in a recent month, and a fund with very deep-pocketed, strategic backing had verbally agreed to lead our A round.

But we faced a set of new challenges in 2014. Perhaps most significant, Spotify’s free offering on mobile, launched in December 2013, began to cannibalize our audience. The investor we’d expected to lead our A round backed out. And our growth in listening and revenues during 2013 meant we no longer qualified as a Small Webcaster; instead of paying royalties calculated as a percentage of revenues — such that royalties grow as revenues grow, as one would expect — we now had to pay high per-play rates as a Large Webcaster, taking us out of profitability. Given our primarily ad-based business model in which revenues can fluctuate significantly from one month to the next, it was hard to predict profitability.

We’d set up a mutually beneficial integration with SoundCloud in 2011 so that our DJs — whose playlists heavily favored music from indie labels and DIY artists over that from major labels by a 2:1 margin — could add music from SoundCloud to a playlist, driving plays and exposure for those artists. In 2015, however, SoundCloud required that we reverse our integration. As early-adopting music consumers had shifted to on-demand streaming from downloads, many 8tracks DJs no longer had the “raw materials” to craft playlists.

The combination of Spotify’s growth in listenership at our expense, mainstream adoption of on-demand streaming in lieu of track downloads (creating an impediment to curation for many of our DJs), a loss of 1/3 of our streaming hours over the 18 months to July 2015, our inability to raise a Series A round, and increasingly challenging unit economics suggested it was, in fact, time to sell. Accordingly, we met with several investment banks and opted to “run a process” with Perella Weinberg to find a good home with a shared vision and greater resources. But despite broad outreach and myriad meetings, we found no credible buyers. I suspect most investors expected we’d shut down, but we loved our product and community and wanted to find some way forward.

Historically, we paid royalties for all streaming to SoundExchange (the entity established to collect and administer royalties under the US compulsory license for webcasting) as we didn’t always know a listener’s location, and to ensure all artists were getting paid through a fair system. However, in early 2016, we were required to cut off streaming to listeners outside the US and Canada. The royalty rates offered under direct licenses in other countries were too expensive vis-a-vis the CPMs achievable through programmatic advertising (e.g. Google AdSense), and we were too small to field regional sales teams. As 40% of our listenership had come from outside the US and Canada, the depth and diversity of our programming — a value proposition that had long set 8tracks apart — took a hit.

But our community also remained undeterred. Shortly after the cutoff, we ran a “testing the waters” campaign to gauge interest in a Regulation A (equity-based) crowdfunding round, newly available under the JOBS Act. As our community creates our programming and has a psychological investment in the 8tracks platform, it stood to reason that passion might be meaningfully consummated in a financial investment. We were amazed to receive over $33m of investment interest. Of course, we recognized there’d be a delta between what people said they’d invest and what they actually would, and we set a cap of $11m on the round.

While we waited for approval of our SEC filing, we ran low on cash. We considered our options and proposed a plan — “maintenance mode” — whereby contributors on our team could voluntarily reduce their pay to conserve cash; in return, if we raised at least $5m, we’d pay the shortfall plus a cash bonus. As always, prior and since, the team’s commitment to our shared vision was humbling. Nearly all took the pay cuts, and we scraped by until the first receipts from crowdfunding came in. Unfortunately, for regulatory reasons, credit cards could not be used to invest; and while SeedInvest, the platform we used to execute the round, was able to accept debit cards initially, our debit card processor decided, several weeks in, that it no longer wished to support crowdfunding initiatives. This processor held up the money invested for a month, and then in an attempt to reverse the debits inadvertently charged debit card investors a second time. While that situation was ultimately resolved, it took a toll, and we raised less than $2m in the round — a good showing for an early crowdfunding round but not enough for our ambitions.

By October that year, as our crowdfunding, listener count, streaming hours and revenues all fell short of expectations, it was clear that we needed to make a significant change to increase revenues and/or decrease expenses — or we’d be on a trajectory to run out of money. We laid off more than half of the team, shifted our focus to a subscription model through introduction of a weekly listening cap, and outlined our plans and rationale on the company blog. While the introduction of audio ads a year later helped us remove the listening cap, and we returned to monthly profitability in April 2018, our audience and revenues have never recovered. As we could only afford to support a small team (and only 4 contractors working one day per week for the last year), we’ve had to prioritize maintaining the service over innovation, and our listenership and revenues have steadily declined.

About a year ago, we decided we’d explore what we called our “Switzerland strategy,” whereby listeners could authenticate on 8tracks with their preferred on-demand music streaming service and then stream 8tracks playlists using that account. We further envisioned 8tracks could become a platform that could connect different services, so one DJ could use her Spotify account to publish a playlist into 8tracks, which could then be streamed by a listener using his Apple Music account. While I still think this idea has legs, we simply didn’t have the resources to properly execute this vision.

In the spring, SoundExchange reached out to push for payment of back royalties. Based on advice of counsel and advisors, we decided to pursue an “ABC” (assignment for the benefit of creditors). With the leadership of a dedicated firm called Armanino, we ran a very thorough M&A process (yet again) to find a buyer. In an ABC, the highest bid is designated the “winner,” assets (but not liabilities) are assigned to a new holding company (old company is shut down), and the winner buys the assets from this holding company, with proceeds administered by (in our case) Armanino to pay creditors ratably based on the liabilities outstanding. This process uncovers our “true” fair market value — based on what, in fact, a company is willing to pay for 8tracks today — maximizing the return to creditors and, if liabilities are repaid, our return to investors. We found a prospective low-ball buyer in the fall but, last Thursday, that buyer decided not to complete its purchase of the company.

 

Why we’re shutting down

To state it simply, we’re shutting down because we can’t generate enough revenue, at our current scale, to cover royalties that continue to increase. One could blame “the music industry” for the travails of 8tracks — the path to the grave has been well trodden by many digital music startups these last 20 years. But the challenges run deeper, and I think it’s instructive to consider the perspective of the artist and label. As technology has advanced, the atomic unit of consumption has shifted, from prepayment for consumption of all the songs in an album (the CD), to prepayment for use of a single song (the download), to pay-as-you-go for an individual song (the stream). With each step, the artist (and anyone who represents that artist, like a label) gets paid less and later; with each step, the listener gains more flexibility in paying for and consuming what they want, when they want it.

While the resulting pressure on margins suggests a shift away from the traditional label structure, toward an artist services model, the fact remains that it’s not easy for most artists to generate meaningful revenues through music streaming — particularly as streaming consumption has spread “down the Tail” to DIY artists, independent labels, back catalog at major labels, and even AI-generated music. More than 40,000 tracks are added to Spotify every day, and myriad forms of digital entertainment and information — the rabbit hole of YouTube, games, apps, blogs, newsletters and more — compete for the attention of the youthful demographics that traditionally consume the most music. It’s unsurprising that royalties remain expensive and will continue to increase.

Given the magnitude of music royalties, the only way to field a enduring streaming music service (if music from the major labels is to be offered) is through money and scale. We’re nearly out of cash and can’t afford to pay current and past royalties, which we expected we’d be able to pay off in whole or in part through the ABC process mentioned above. But the reason we fell behind in royalties is because we steadily lost the scale of listenership necessary to sell advertising with a direct sales team at CPMs that would cover compulsory royalty rates with a solid margin. And the steady decline in our free, ad-supported audience resulted in a smaller base of active listeners that might eventually be converted to 8tracks Plus, our ad-free subscription offering.

We lost listenership, in large part, because Spotify was able to satisfactorily address listener needs for music discovery and activity- and mood-based listening over time, as it improved its offering, reducing the relative appeal of 8tracks’ early lead in delivering on its unique value propositions through a crowd-curated model. (As a sidebar, I’d argue that listener and curator needs for community and social interaction are still underserved.)

Moreover, Spotify offers a complete music streaming experience, spanning on-demand and lean-back (radio) listening. Our bet was that most consumers, most of the time, would opt for highly tailored lean-back programming — because easy and relevant — and could pop out to an on-demand service once in a while when they wished to hear a particular track or artist. And we were right, in part. Executives at on-demand services note that, after a new user’s honeymoon period of building her on-demand library, she generally migrates to listening to her library (aka liked songs) on shuffle or to a lean-back program of music (playlist or station). Nonetheless, easy, on-demand access to any song has proven to be a must-have requirement; it’s what people are accustomed to in the “ownership” model, and periodic on-demand listening makes algorithmic lean-back selections ever better. The upshot is that the average music consumer wants all of his listening needs addressed “under one roof.”

Given 8tracks’ audience size and declining trajectory vis-a-vis Spotify, Apple, Amazon and Google/YouTube, we were unable to raise sufficient funding (or find a good home for the company) to properly invest in product development, both for features that would have capitalized on 8tracks’ unique value proposition in the streaming music ecosystem as well as for features viewed today by most consumers as “must-haves” (such as the aforementioned on-demand licenses that, during our peak years, would have required 10s of millions in investment to fund). Without sufficient funding, we couldn’t hire (or retain) the people needed to drive this product innovation; without product innovation, we’ve fallen further behind competing services, reducing our audience and revenues further in a downward spiral.

We — the remaining team at 8tracks — all think it’s still to hard to find playlists with a “soul behind the music.” User programmed playlists on Spotify and YouTube are great, but they remain relatively hard to navigate to find the best ones for a particular person’s taste, time or place. And there’s not (as yet) an ecosystem to allow curators to flourish. There’s still work to be done.

 

Get your playlists

While we can’t port the 8tracks community to an existing music streaming platform en masse, we can make it easy for you to grab the metadata from playlists you’ve created or liked, so you can re-create these playlists on your second-favorite music streaming service ; )

If you’ve ever published a playlist on 8tracks, you’ll receive an email today or later this week, including the mix name, art, description and tracklist for each. If you registered with 8tracks using your Facebook or Google credentials, please send us an email at support@8tracks.com, including your 8tracks user name, and we’ll email you this information for each of your playlists.

In addition, on 8tracks.com, you can export any 8tracks playlist to Spotify by clicking the “Save playlist to Spotify” button included on top of the mix art. This process isn’t perfect, as some tracks aren’t available on Spotify, and others are available but aren’t matched to Spotify’s catalog. But 80-90% of tracks in a given playlist should match, for most genres. Note that we can’t make any assurance as to how long the website may remain up and running, so please act now if you’d like to migrate your favorite playlists over to Spotify.

 

8tracks, by the numbers

In closing, I thought it might be interesting to reflect on 8tracks, Harper’s Index-style, by the numbers:

  • Months since incorporation: 159
  • Months since launch: 137
  • No. of registered users: 19.6m
  • No. of DJs: 750k
  • No. of playlists: 3.5m
  • No. of tags: 500k
  • Monthly active users (Nov 2019): 927k
  • Hours streamed per month (Nov 2019): 539k
  • Subscription revenue (Oct 2019): $47k
  • Advertising revenue (Oct 2019): $6k
  • EBITDA (Oct 2019): $18k
  • No. of investors in our Seed 1 round: 37
  • Funding raised in our Seed 1 round: $1.2m
  • No. of investors in our Seed 2 round: 40
  • Funding raised in our Seed 2 round: $1.4m
  • No. of investors in our Regulation A crowdfunding round: 4,464
  • Funding raised in Regulation A crowdfunding round: $1.8m
  • No. of investors willing to lead our Series A round: 0
  • No. of buyers in 2015 M&A process led by Perella Weinberg: 0
  • No. of buyers in 2019 M&A process led by Armanino: 0

8tracks Launches Audio Ads in Canada With LeanStream

8tracks and leanStream8tracks, the third-largest internet radio service among U.S. millennials, and leanStream, the largest audio ad marketplace in Canada, have announced a new partnership.

After a successful roll-out of audio ads in the US, 8tracks will now offer audio advertising in Canada with leanStream. 8tracks boasts 3,000,000 handcrafted playlists and a large audience in Canada, with nearly 90% between the ages of 18-34.

Audio ad units will include pre-roll, mid-roll and special sponsorships such as branded playlists and first impression takeovers. Thanks to 8tracks’ crowd-curated approach, every playlist on 8tracks has tags that marketers can use to target advertising, including hundreds of thousands of moods, activities, genres, and artists. Clients can run audio ads alongside select tags. For example, a coffee company can run ads on playlists with tags such as coffee, chill, cafe, morning, breakfast and wake up, or a fitness company can run ads on playlists with tags like running, workout, gym, cardio, and motivation.

“Our new audio ad partnership with leanStream gives marketers access to our Canadian audience in highly-targeted ways, even when listeners tune in from a mobile device that’s tucked away in a pocket,” noted David Porter, 8tracks’ CEO and Founder.

leanStream will exclusively represent 8tracks in the Canadian market. Audio ads are available to advertisers with a managed service or through programmatic deals. In the move, Jesse Haw, previously Partnerships Director for Canada at 8tracks, joins the leanStream team. Jesse will continue to build out unique executions for 8tracks as well as other clients.

“We are fully committed to the development of digital audio sales as a source of high-value audio inventory placements for advertisers and revenue for broadcasters, music streaming services & podcasters. We are excited to add 8tracks to our substantial digital audio ad marketplace for advertisers.” Said Chris Nimigon, CRO and Partner.

Unlimited free streaming is back!

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Thanks to our much-appreciated 8tracks Plus subscribers and the recent introduction of new audio adswe’re beyond excited to say goodbye to the loathed weekly free listening limit for people in the US. Now, listeners can stream 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year, all for FREE!

And it gets even better; the 1-track limit for logged-out listeners has also been removed, so now when you share a mix with friends, they can hear the entire thing right away. We promise this isn’t some cruel joke; go ahead and share any of these mixes with a friend to see for yourself!

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We’ve faced lots of challenges over the past couple years, but with the help of our community, we’ve been able to make excellent progress towards overcoming each obstacle. It’s truly a fact that 8tracks exists because of you – the avid DJs, investors, and listeners responsible for it all.

And the fun is just getting started! We have a newly-released Spotify integration, an upcoming Alexa integration, and a bigger, new music library on the way which will eventually support mix-making in our mobile apps.

To see more of our upcoming projects and be an active part of 8tracks’ future, join us here on Wefunder where we’re about to launch a new crowdfunding round which will allow investors to own shares in 8tracks and receive a lifetime upgrade to ad-free 8tracks Plus. Over $100,000 worth of shares have already been reserved by 400+ investors since our Wefunder profile opened last week.

Reserve shares in 8tracks

 Thanks for your support!

–David Porter | CEO & Founder, 8tracks

 


8TRACKS’ OFFERING MATERIALS MAY CONTAIN FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THE COMPANY, ITS BUSINESS PLAN AND STRATEGY, AND ITS INDUSTRY. THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE BASED ON THE BELIEFS OF, ASSUMPTIONS MADE BY, AND INFORMATION CURRENTLY AVAILABLE TO THE COMPANY’S MANAGEMENT. WHEN USED IN THE OFFERING MATERIALS, THE WORDS “ESTIMATE,” “PROJECT,” “BELIEVE,” “ANTICIPATE,” “INTEND,” “EXPECT” AND SIMILAR EXPRESSIONS ARE INTENDED TO IDENTIFY FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH CONSTITUTE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE STATEMENTS REFLECT MANAGEMENT’S CURRENT VIEWS WITH RESPECT TO FUTURE EVENTS AND ARE SUBJECT TO RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES THAT COULD CAUSE THE COMPANY’S ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE CONTAINED IN THE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. INVESTORS ARE CAUTIONED NOT TO PLACE UNDUE RELIANCE ON THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH SPEAK ONLY AS OF THE DATE ON WHICH THEY ARE MADE. THE COMPANY DOES NOT UNDERTAKE ANY OBLIGATION TO REVISE OR UPDATE THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS TO REFLECT EVENTS OR CIRCUMSTANCES AFTER SUCH DATE OR TO REFLECT THE OCCURRENCE OF UNANTICIPATED EVENTS. THE COMPANY IS “TESTING THE WATERS” UNDER REGULATION A UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933. THIS PROCESS ALLOWS COMPANIES TO DETERMINE WHETHER THERE MAY BE INTEREST IN AN EVENTUAL OFFERING OF ITS SECURITIES. THE COMPANY IS NOT UNDER ANY OBLIGATION TO MAKE AN OFFERING UNDER REGULATION A. IT MAY CHOOSE TO MAKE AN OFFERING TO SOME, BUT NOT ALL, OF THE PEOPLE WHO INDICATE AN INTEREST IN INVESTING, AND THAT OFFERING MIGHT NOT BE MADE UNDER REGULATION A. IF THE COMPANY DOES GO AHEAD WITH AN OFFERING, IT WILL ONLY BE ABLE TO MAKE SALES AFTER IT HAS FILED AN OFFERING STATEMENT WITH THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) AND THE SEC HAS “QUALIFIED” THE OFFERING STATEMENT. THE INFORMATION IN THAT OFFERING STATEMENT WILL BE MORE COMPLETE THAN THE INFORMATION THE COMPANY IS PROVIDING NOW, AND COULD DIFFER IN IMPORTANT WAYS. YOU MUST READ THE DOCUMENTS FILED WITH THE SEC BEFORE INVESTING. NO MONEY OR OTHER CONSIDERATION IS BEING SOLICITED, AND IF SENT IN RESPONSE, WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. NO OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES CAN BE ACCEPTED AND NO PART OF THE PURCHASE PRICE CAN BE RECEIVED UNTIL THE OFFERING STATEMENT FILED BY THE COMPANY WITH THE SEC HAS BEEN QUALIFIED BY THE SEC. ANY SUCH OFFER MAY BE WITHDRAWN OR REVOKED, WITHOUT OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND, AT ANY TIME BEFORE NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE GIVEN AFTER THE DATE OF QUALIFICATION. AN INDICATION OF INTEREST INVOLVES NO OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND.

Launching on WeFunder Soon

8tracks and WeFunder unite!

In 2016, 8tracks became one of the first startups in history to become directly owned by the people who use it, thanks to 4,000 DJs, listeners, and angel investors who participated in the crowdfunding round. All of our investors received a lifetime upgrade to our premium, ad-free service, 8tracks Plus. We’re pleased to announce that a fresh crowdfunding round (with the same perks) is coming soon.

In our first crowdfunding round, a number of investors were unable to participate because of a variety of issues and limited payment methods. In this new round, we’ve partnered with WeFunder – a user-friendly company that offers streamlined payment methods, accepts investors from outside the US, and self-describes as “a place where you can invest in the startups you love to solve the problems you care about.”

Thanks to healthy growth in 8tracks Plus subscribers as well as the recent rollout of audio ads – and associated removal of the overly restrictive, one-hour/week listening limit – we’re getting ever closer to financial sustainability. Your support will allow us to increase our focus on new features, integrations, and improvements important to the community.

Before our new crowdfunding round opens in April, we’d love to understand if you’d consider participating. Check out our WeFunder profile here to learn more about our progress and to let us know if you’d like to invest.

8tracks launching soon on Wefunder

 

8 Facts About 8tracks & The Upcoming WeFunder Round

#1. All investors will receive a lifetime upgrade to 8tracks Plus – our premium subscription service ($4.99/month) with unlimited, ad-free listening, along with access to an exclusive investor Facebook group and a shiny investor badge on your 8tracks profile.

#2. Thanks in large part to the steady growth of 8tracks Plus subscribers, we reached gross profitability last October and we’re on track to achieve net profitability by the end of Q1. To give some perspective, here are a few music streaming services which are not currently profitable: Spotify, SoundCloud, Pandora, Deezer, Tidal, iHeartRadio, Napster.

#3. Last month, thanks to the introduction of audio ads, we were able to significantly raise the free listening limit for US listeners (less than 1% of listeners reach the limit now). Early results look positive, and we hope to be able to remove the limits altogether in the near future.

#4. WeFunder offers an excellent selection of robust payment methods, including all major credit cards, bank accounts, checks, and even Bitcoin. Oh, and the minimum investment is just $100.

#5. There’s a staggering amount of handcrafted playlists on 8tracks, with over 3m curated by 765,000 DJs and more being published every day.

#6. We’re the #3 internet radio service for US millennials, with ⅔ of all streaming coming from independent labels & artists. We’re all about helping people discover great and often new music that doesn’t get surfaced by algorithms.

#7. More than $5m has been raised so far from over 4,000 investors including Andreessen Horowitz, Index Ventures, Steve Aoki, and the CEO of Atlantic Records.

#8. Here’s what funding will help us achieve over the next year:

  • Improve the listener experience with our new “Stations” concept, making it easy for listeners to search and save sets of playlists organized by taste and context
  • Simplify the DJ experience through new features, offering mix creation on our mobile apps, and offering a larger music library with content from major labels
  • Integrate 8tracks where and how listeners tune in today, ensuring 8tracks complements on-demand listening (e.g. Spotify) and is available on voice-enabled devices (e.g. Amazon Echo)
  • Sign key deals with major and indie labels to expand music library, provide offline listening, and allow more skips
  • Optimize our advertising sales process and products
  • Increase subscriptions through a better product (e.g. more features, exclusive content), and better marketing (e.g. customer referral program, optimizing price points)

And there’s so much more we’ll be able to accomplish with your help! Follow our WeFunder profile to be notified the second our round launches.

–David Porter | CEO & Founder, 8tracks

Follow 8tracks on WeFunder


8TRACKS’ OFFERING MATERIALS MAY CONTAIN FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THE COMPANY, ITS BUSINESS PLAN AND STRATEGY, AND ITS INDUSTRY. THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE BASED ON THE BELIEFS OF, ASSUMPTIONS MADE BY, AND INFORMATION CURRENTLY AVAILABLE TO THE COMPANY’S MANAGEMENT. WHEN USED IN THE OFFERING MATERIALS, THE WORDS “ESTIMATE,” “PROJECT,” “BELIEVE,” “ANTICIPATE,” “INTEND,” “EXPECT” AND SIMILAR EXPRESSIONS ARE INTENDED TO IDENTIFY FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH CONSTITUTE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE STATEMENTS REFLECT MANAGEMENT’S CURRENT VIEWS WITH RESPECT TO FUTURE EVENTS AND ARE SUBJECT TO RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES THAT COULD CAUSE THE COMPANY’S ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE CONTAINED IN THE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. INVESTORS ARE CAUTIONED NOT TO PLACE UNDUE RELIANCE ON THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH SPEAK ONLY AS OF THE DATE ON WHICH THEY ARE MADE. THE COMPANY DOES NOT UNDERTAKE ANY OBLIGATION TO REVISE OR UPDATE THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS TO REFLECT EVENTS OR CIRCUMSTANCES AFTER SUCH DATE OR TO REFLECT THE OCCURRENCE OF UNANTICIPATED EVENTS. THE COMPANY IS “TESTING THE WATERS” UNDER REGULATION A UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933. THIS PROCESS ALLOWS COMPANIES TO DETERMINE WHETHER THERE MAY BE INTEREST IN AN EVENTUAL OFFERING OF ITS SECURITIES. THE COMPANY IS NOT UNDER ANY OBLIGATION TO MAKE AN OFFERING UNDER REGULATION A. IT MAY CHOOSE TO MAKE AN OFFERING TO SOME, BUT NOT ALL, OF THE PEOPLE WHO INDICATE AN INTEREST IN INVESTING, AND THAT OFFERING MIGHT NOT BE MADE UNDER REGULATION A. IF THE COMPANY DOES GO AHEAD WITH AN OFFERING, IT WILL ONLY BE ABLE TO MAKE SALES AFTER IT HAS FILED AN OFFERING STATEMENT WITH THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) AND THE SEC HAS “QUALIFIED” THE OFFERING STATEMENT. THE INFORMATION IN THAT OFFERING STATEMENT WILL BE MORE COMPLETE THAN THE INFORMATION THE COMPANY IS PROVIDING NOW, AND COULD DIFFER IN IMPORTANT WAYS. YOU MUST READ THE DOCUMENTS FILED WITH THE SEC BEFORE INVESTING. NO MONEY OR OTHER CONSIDERATION IS BEING SOLICITED, AND IF SENT IN RESPONSE, WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. NO OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES CAN BE ACCEPTED AND NO PART OF THE PURCHASE PRICE CAN BE RECEIVED UNTIL THE OFFERING STATEMENT FILED BY THE COMPANY WITH THE SEC HAS BEEN QUALIFIED BY THE SEC. ANY SUCH OFFER MAY BE WITHDRAWN OR REVOKED, WITHOUT OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND, AT ANY TIME BEFORE NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE GIVEN AFTER THE DATE OF QUALIFICATION. AN INDICATION OF INTEREST INVOLVES NO OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND.

8tracks + Spotify: a perfect match

8tracks + Spotify - A Perfect Match

Radio has always been the way people discover music – listeners get turned onto new artists they come to love and then buy their music to tune in whenever they want. Even with the rapid advance of technology, this path is no less true today than it was 30 years ago.

Spotify offers the ultimate version of a record store, giving access to nearly every track ever recorded, anytime, anywhere. But the trick is finding the stuff that’s just right for you. On 8tracks, nearly 1m DJs actively curate playlists, introducing more listeners to both familiar and lesser-known, independent artists. We complement the algorithmic playlisting on Spotify with a curated touch that spans every imaginable style, for any time and place.

It’s with this in mind that we’re pleased to announce our new integration on the 8tracks iOS app, allowing you to automatically save favorited tracks from 8tracks to a brand-new “8tracks Discoveries” playlist on Spotify. The gems you uncover on 8tracks can now be enjoyed with on-demand playback anytime you want.

How it works

1. Download the latest 8tracks iOS app version here (version # 3.3.72) if you don’t have it already.

2. Sign into your 8tracks account in the app, then tap this link or the images below, and follow the steps to connect your Spotify account. Or, you can just tap the  to favorite a new track in the 8tracks iOS app and you’ll be prompted to connect your accounts.

How it works

3. Once your accounts are connected, 8tracks will automatically create a new Spotify playlist in the top position titled ‘8tracks Discoveries’ where new tracks you favorite in our iOS app will be saved. That’s it!

8tracks Discoveries on Spotify
Enjoy your 8tracks Discoveries on any platform Spotify supports.

 

Connect your Spotify

 

There’s more to come on the Spotify front in the months ahead:

  • Save your favorites to Spotify on web and Android as well as iOS
  • Import your past favorites to get lost in nostalgia revisit fond memories with a soundtrack to match
  • Potential deeper integration to give DJs and listeners more ways to listen and share the music they love

Meanwhile, we’re working on an upcoming Alexa integration, which plays particularly well with all of the amazing ways our community has tagged playlists over the years; “Alexa, play me happy shower music with Journey and Michael Jackson.

And our upcoming crowdfunding round on Wefunder will directly support us as we make progress towards new integrations and features. Learn more here about how you can become an investor and get a lifetime upgrade to ad-free 8tracks Plus.

Visit 8tracks on Wefunder

Thanks for your support!

–David Porter
CEO & Founder, 8tracks


8TRACKS’ OFFERING MATERIALS MAY CONTAIN FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THE COMPANY, ITS BUSINESS PLAN AND STRATEGY, AND ITS INDUSTRY. THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE BASED ON THE BELIEFS OF, ASSUMPTIONS MADE BY, AND INFORMATION CURRENTLY AVAILABLE TO THE COMPANY’S MANAGEMENT. WHEN USED IN THE OFFERING MATERIALS, THE WORDS “ESTIMATE,” “PROJECT,” “BELIEVE,” “ANTICIPATE,” “INTEND,” “EXPECT” AND SIMILAR EXPRESSIONS ARE INTENDED TO IDENTIFY FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH CONSTITUTE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE STATEMENTS REFLECT MANAGEMENT’S CURRENT VIEWS WITH RESPECT TO FUTURE EVENTS AND ARE SUBJECT TO RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES THAT COULD CAUSE THE COMPANY’S ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE CONTAINED IN THE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. INVESTORS ARE CAUTIONED NOT TO PLACE UNDUE RELIANCE ON THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH SPEAK ONLY AS OF THE DATE ON WHICH THEY ARE MADE. THE COMPANY DOES NOT UNDERTAKE ANY OBLIGATION TO REVISE OR UPDATE THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS TO REFLECT EVENTS OR CIRCUMSTANCES AFTER SUCH DATE OR TO REFLECT THE OCCURRENCE OF UNANTICIPATED EVENTS. THE COMPANY IS “TESTING THE WATERS” UNDER REGULATION A UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933. THIS PROCESS ALLOWS COMPANIES TO DETERMINE WHETHER THERE MAY BE INTEREST IN AN EVENTUAL OFFERING OF ITS SECURITIES. THE COMPANY IS NOT UNDER ANY OBLIGATION TO MAKE AN OFFERING UNDER REGULATION A. IT MAY CHOOSE TO MAKE AN OFFERING TO SOME, BUT NOT ALL, OF THE PEOPLE WHO INDICATE AN INTEREST IN INVESTING, AND THAT OFFERING MIGHT NOT BE MADE UNDER REGULATION A. IF THE COMPANY DOES GO AHEAD WITH AN OFFERING, IT WILL ONLY BE ABLE TO MAKE SALES AFTER IT HAS FILED AN OFFERING STATEMENT WITH THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) AND THE SEC HAS “QUALIFIED” THE OFFERING STATEMENT. THE INFORMATION IN THAT OFFERING STATEMENT WILL BE MORE COMPLETE THAN THE INFORMATION THE COMPANY IS PROVIDING NOW, AND COULD DIFFER IN IMPORTANT WAYS. YOU MUST READ THE DOCUMENTS FILED WITH THE SEC BEFORE INVESTING. NO MONEY OR OTHER CONSIDERATION IS BEING SOLICITED, AND IF SENT IN RESPONSE, WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. NO OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES CAN BE ACCEPTED AND NO PART OF THE PURCHASE PRICE CAN BE RECEIVED UNTIL THE OFFERING STATEMENT FILED BY THE COMPANY WITH THE SEC HAS BEEN QUALIFIED BY THE SEC. ANY SUCH OFFER MAY BE WITHDRAWN OR REVOKED, WITHOUT OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND, AT ANY TIME BEFORE NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE GIVEN AFTER THE DATE OF QUALIFICATION. AN INDICATION OF INTEREST INVOLVES NO OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND.

Audio Ads = More Free Listening

8tracks introduces audio ads

Thanks to our community’s response to a survey last summer, and recent testing on the iOS app and website, we’re introducing a new type of ad format – audio ads – which makes it possible for US listeners to tune into a lot more free music each week!!

As we described during the rollout of listening limits in December 2016, streaming music is expensive. Selling ads through an in-house sales team wasn’t economical at our scale (then and now), and visual ads sold “programmatically” don’t consistently cover our royalties, a situation exacerbated by the prevalence of ad blockers. In short, we were losing money for every hour streamed by an ad-based listener.

To keep 8tracks running, we shifted away from a direct ad sales force to reduce fixed monthly costs; introduced a weekly limit on free, ad-based listening; and promoted unlimited, ad-free, subscription-based listening via 8tracks Plus. We also required listeners who use ad-blocking software in their web browser to whitelist us. These steps have helped tremendously: we’re still in business and closer to sustainability each month. We expect to reach monthly profitability in early 2018, which will allow us to return our focus to new features, integrations, and improvements important to our community.

Yet a listening limit is far from perfect for everyone: it’s a poor experience for our listeners, and it artificially reduces the size of 8tracks’ audience. Based on recent testing and community feedback, we believe audio ads strike the right balance between revenue generation and the user experience. While we recognize that audio ads interrupt a listener’s flow, they increase our revenue per hour by enough to allow us to stream to free listeners without an overly restrictive listening limit.

You may have already noticed a significant boost to your free weekly listening as these new ads are introduced. If you’d like to share your thoughts on this change (good or bad), just let us know here – we’d love to hear from you!

Of course, we want to make sure that you have the freedom of choice, so the “best of both worlds” scenario remains: you can always sign up for 8tracks Plus (for as little as $30 per year) and enjoy an uninterrupted, unlimited, ad-free streaming experience – all the while helping us cover the costs of royalties that support the hardworking artists you discover on 8tracks.

If you’d like to become an ultimate supporter, you can add your email here to be notified when our upcoming investment round launches soon on WeFunder. Among other perks, you’ll be able to receive a lifetime upgrade to 8tracks Plus and join nearly 4,000 other illustrious 8tracks investors. Stay tuned!

–David Porter
CEO & founder, 8tracks

Eight turns nine

As I’ve found myself saying far too frequently of late, “How has it been [some number] years since [some event] already?!” So it is with our ninth birthday, which feels to have come fast on the heels of our eighth. I’ve created a celebratory playlist for this special day, just as I did on the day of our launch.

 

Nine years ago today, my co-founder Remi worked away in San Francisco, and our lead web developer Ed in Williamsburg, putting the final touches on the live product. The team headed out to the Stanton Social in the Lower East Side to celebrate in the warm summer night. It was a good era all around: SoundCloud had just launched, Tumblr was the hottest thing around, it looked like Obama might just head to the White House. And we were just getting started.

Love from StumbleUpon the next spring (The Ocarina of Rhyme and Songs that make you feel better in particular) set us on an upward trajectory. This growth fueled investor interest. We closed our first institutional funding (Index, A16Z, SoftTech and Pete Tong, among others) and hired our first full-time employees in August 2011 — exactly 3 years after launch. Post-funding, we returned to profitability in a year and our audience grew fifteen-fold over two.

But just as most of us experience in life, 8tracks has seen its share of downs as well as ups, particularly over the last several years: Spotify’s well-funded ascent, the loss of SoundCloud as a source for DJs, the required cutoff of international streaming, several rounds of layoffs, and the introduction of a US free listening limit.

However, these hard decisions have allowed us to conserve cash; coupled with the nearly $2m raised from the 8tracks community last year, we’ve been able to make steady progress toward sustainability. Over the next year, we’re looking forward to product innovation and smart integrations. On our short list: a full DJ library on mobile, integration with Spotify, the ability to play music from your Amazon Echo or Google Home, and eventually, for subscribers, offline listening with more track skips.

We’re also firing up a fresh crowdfunding round on WeFunder. In addition to supporting the independent music service you love, you’ll get a lifetime upgrade to 8tracks Plus with your investment. Sign up here to be notified when the round launches.

Despite our challenges, we’re pleased with our path these last 108 months, and we’re happy to be able to serve our community today. Equipped with stronger financials, fresh funding and a clear plan to deliver a better experience for listeners and DJs, we’re excited about 8tracks’ tenth year. Thanks for joining us for this trip around the sun!

Password security alert

We received credible reports today that a copy of our user database has been leaked, including the email addresses and encrypted passwords of only those 8tracks users who signed up using email. If you signed up via Google or Facebook authentication, then your password is not affected by this leak. 8tracks does not store passwords in a plain text format, but rather uses one-way hashes to ensure they remain difficult to access. These password hashes can only be decrypted using brute force attacks, which are expensive and time-consuming, even for one password.

We have found what we believe to be the method of the attack and taken precautions to ensure our databases are secure. 8tracks does not store sensitive customer data such as credit card numbers, phone numbers, or street addresses.

What does this mean for 8tracks users?

Passwords on 8tracks are hashed and salted, meaning that even we can’t tell you what your password is by looking at the database. Although the decryption of one particular user’s password through brute-force techniques is unlikely, we recommend that users change their password on 8tracks and any sites on which they may have used the same password to ensure their personal security. This type of data breach is similar to those previously reported to have impacted accounts with Adobe, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Tumblr and MySpace.

We recommend that people refrain from using the same password across multiple sites, particularly on sensitive applications like email or banking software. We suggest making use of two-factor authentication and using a password manager like LastPass or 1password.

What got leaked and how?

We believe the vector for the attack was an employee’s Github account, which was not secured using two-factor authentication. We were alerted to this breach by an unauthorized password change attempt via Github, and it was verified independently by examining data from journalists and a security services company.

We do not believe this breach involved access to database or production servers, which are secured by public/private SSH-key pairs. However, it did allow access to a system containing a backup of database tables, including this user data. We have secured the account in question, changed passwords for our storage systems, and added access logging to our backup system. We are auditing all our security practices and have already taken steps to enforce 2-step authentication on Github, to limit access to repositories, and to improve our password encryption.

We apologize to those affected by this breach for the inconvenience and are grateful for your understanding and support. We are committed to doing our absolute best to protect our community and keep our users’ data safe.

 

Independent Radio and the Challenges of Streaming Music

Independent Radio and the Challenges of Streaming Music

As many of you are aware, we announced new limits for US listeners in October. We’re not happy about having to establish these limits, and we wouldn’t be taking this path if we had another option. In this post, I’d like to go a bit deeper in explaining our decision, providing more context and detailing our underlying economics, to ensure our listeners have a crystal clear understanding of why we’re taking the tack we’ve pursued.

So it began

My original conception of 8tracks dates back nearly 20 years, from the time I lived in London and enjoyed its rich, diverse electronic music culture. Inspired the culture’s focus on the DJ, I envisioned a music-based social network that democratized the role of the DJ, allowing anyone who loves music to curate playlists for others who hadn’t the knowledge or time. My belief was that music was most effectively “packaged” by people (not algorithms).

Fast-forward 10 years, I found myself bootstrapping 8tracks on a nights-and-weekends basis with a loan against my 401(k) plan, eventually launching the service on August 8th, 2008. We saw good early take-up and, by the end of 2010, began to get interest from investors. Three years after launch, on the back of a $1.2m seed round, we hired our first employees. We achieved profitability 18 months later thanks to our status as a Small Webcaster, which allowed us to pay royalties on a percentage of our revenues (rather than on a per-play basis that ignores the level of revenue generated).

The challenges of streaming music

Despite encouraging growth and even profitability, it proved challenging to raise a significant “Series A” round from traditional investors. Top venture capital firms seek startups in less competitive sectors, with more favorable economics, which they believe are on track to be valued at over $1 billion. We grew out of Small Webcaster status in 2014 and, as our royalty burden grew, we became unprofitable once again.

We’ve long believed in the advertising model, as radio — historically and still the primary way new music is both promoted and discovered — should be free to allow artists to reach the widest possible audience. Our devoted community has grown around this free, ad-supported model for years. Unfortunately, our royalty rates in the US grew by yet another 20%+ in 2016. Moreover, we saw a decline in our audience during 2015 and 2016, making the advertising model more challenging (more on that in a bit). And our crowdfunding round this year, while a great showing of support from our community, has ended up coming in at a much slower rate, and at a lower amount, than we’d anticipated based on our initial survey of the community in early 2016.

Bottom line, the royalty rates we pay are too high to support our costs with a free, ad-based listening model in the US. I know that some listeners are genuinely frustrated by the limits, but it’s important to realize that no digital music service is generating a profit. Larger services have raised billions to fund continued losses or may simply use music as a “loss leader” to derive revenue through another business line.

By the numbers

The simplest way to demonstrate our range of options is to look at the math. In the US, the sound recording royalty we pay under the compulsory license is $0.0017 per ad-supported stream, nearly 19X the equivalent rate in Canada (which is why an ad-based model on a medium-sized platform remains viable there). The economics of music streaming are typically evaluated by denominating revenues and expenses on an hourly — or “per 1,000 hour” — basis. Our average track length is 4 minutes, so multiplying $0.0017 x 15 equals $0.0255. The royalty cost per 1,000 hours (“CPM”) is thus $25.50, and this represents most of the direct cost “hurdle” we have to recover through advertising and subscription revenues.

In its most recent quarterly resultsPandora generated $58.10 in advertising revenue per 1,000 hours streamed (“RPM”). Pandora is able to cover its sound recording royalty CPM more than twice over because it reaches 78m listeners per month (making it a one-stop-shop for a brand or agency that wants to reach people who listen to music) and employs 100s of people in the ad sales function (more than ½ its team). In comparison, 8tracks’ smaller audience (4m) and sales team (7 people until our layoffs on October 4th) allowed us to generate an average RPM over the last year (through September) of $24.28 — roughly the same level as our royalty CPM.

Sufficient funding would allow us to properly invest in engineering, product and marketing, which would help us attract and retain listeners and thus serve a larger audience. A larger audience, in turn, makes us more attractive to brands and agencies, which typically wish to buy advertising on a few larger services within a particular category (e.g. music) rather than apportion their marketing budget among many services.

Based on extensive modeling, we concluded at the outset of our crowdfunding round that at least $5m but ideally $10m would allow us to aggressively pursue the growth necessary to make an ad-based model work, and we filed with the SEC  to raise up to $11m in June. However, we’ve only closed (to our bank account) $1.5m in funding over the 6 months since the launch of crowdfunding. Another $1m of “confirmed” investment has yet to be be received from crowdfunding investors or SeedInvest, and we plan to continue crowdfunding on another platform in 2017.

Our plan for the future

To make the company sustainable at our current levels of audience and funding, we have to focus on near-term sustainability over mid-term audience growth. This requires that we:

  1. Reduce fixed costs (primarily payroll)
  2. Increase RPM by shifting most of our US revenue mix from ads to subscriptions
  3. Reduce the streaming (and thus royalties) associated with ad-based listening in the US

To reduce fixed costs, we’ve decreased the size of our team. When we filed with the SEC for our crowdfunding round in June, we engaged 26 people as employees or contractors. After 2 rounds of layoffs, we’ve pared back our team to 10 people. As a result of these headcount reductions and other cost-cutting measures, our largely fixed, non-royalty expenses in December (e.g. payroll, taxes, hosting, streaming, office rent, software licenses) will be nearly one-half the monthly level we incurred prior to our first set of cost reductions in March.

To encourage free listeners to subscribe, and to reduce the royalties associated with ad-based listening, we introduced listening limits earlier this month. The additional revenue impact of subscribers is significant: while the average revenue per ad-based listener per month has historically hovered around $0.12, that figure for a subscriber is $2.99 (based on the introductory pricing available this month), a roughly 25X differential. But the listening caps also set a ceiling on the royalty costs associated with free, ad-supported listening, where the associated advertising RPM falls short of the royalty CPM. To ensure we get these limits right, we’re testing several limit tiers and will conclude on the best approach over the next week. The weekly listening limit will help 8tracks return to sustainable economics in 2017.

While we’ll settle on a largely standard listening limit, we’re also rewarding DJs who create excellent playlists with listening time bonuses. We’re also evaluating the impact of these limits on brand-new registrants and we’ll likely offer a higher initial limit for these listeners to fully appreciate the depth and personality of the 8tracks platform.

While we’re not happy about having to introduce limits on free listening, we’re thrilled to be laying the groundwork to offer subscribers great new features…

The silver lining

On a positive note, we have nearly wrapped our deal with the first of the major labels. A number of setbacks over the last year — SoundCloud removal, cutoff of streaming outside the US and Canada, and tightening of skip limits — have been required to make progress and stay in the good graces of the record labels. And now 8tracks is poised to see the upside.

Under the terms of the deal, we’ll be able to provide DJs with direct access to the label’s catalog when creating a playlist, without requiring an upload. Some music will be available without a subscription while other music will require it. In addition, the deal allows subscribers to skip tracks more frequently and save playlists for offline listening; both features will be introduced once we’ve a critical mass of direct deals to support these features. Direct deals also lay the groundwork for making 8tracks available outside the US and Canada.

But, even today, an 8tracks Plus upgrade does more than just remove the weekly listening limit:

  • Ad-free listening, always
  • No interruptions between playlists
  • Animated gifs for your playlist artwork
  • A flashy badge to show off to your friends and admirers

We’re excited by the number of listeners who’ve already shown their support and signed up to 8tracks Plus in the past 10 days, since the introduction of the listening limits. We want the 8tracks platform to continue to provide a unique music discovery experience for people who care about music, and we’re grateful for those who can help us make this transition to a new era for independent radio.

Get unlimited listening and support independent radio with 8tracks Plus